Insights
What does everyone in the modern world need to know? What are the important things that nobody told us about when we were younger? Man does not know that he has a soul and inside him is a field and there is a buried treasure in the field and our education, religion, and philosophy are in a lamentable state, said C.G. Jung. What to do? Man must think for himself.

Below is my collection of articles, videos, and quotations which have been helpful to me in finding a way to remedy the following problem: thinking for himself saves man from ruin. But there's a problem with his intellect: it has escaped man's control and became his obsession.
Marion Woodman: Holding the Tension of the Opposites
A Jungian analyst explores the hidden causes of compulsion in the lives of men and women. At the root of substance abuse, eating disorders, addictions, and compulsive behaviors, M. Woodman sees a split between spirit and matter. She sees the beauty of the Shadow. She sees the hunger for spiritual fulfillment.
Marion Woodman (August 15, 1928–July 9, 2018) was a Canadian author, poet, analytical psychologist, and women’s movement figure. She wrote and spoke about the dream theories of Carl Gustav Jung. This talk is from 1991.
Anyone who wants to know the human mind will learn next to nothing from experimental psychology. He would be better advised to put away his scholar's gown, bid farewell to his study, and wander with human heart through the world. There, in the horrors of prisons, lunatic asylums and hospitals, in drab suburban pubs, in brothels and gambling-hells, in the salons of the elegant, the Stock Exchanges, Socialist meetings, churches, revivalist gatherings and ecstatic sects, through love and hate, through the experience of passion in every form in his own body, he would reap richer stores of knowledge than text-books a foot thick could give him, and he will know how to doctor the sick with real knowledge of the human soul.

– C.G. Jung, “New Paths in Psychology", in CW 7: Two Essays on Analytical Psychology, p.409
Marion Woodman Speaks
A Jungian analyst explores the hidden causes of compulsion in the lives of men and women. At the root of substance abuse, eating disorders, addictions, and compulsive behaviors, M. Woodman sees a split between spirit and matter. She sees the beauty of the Shadow. She sees the hunger for spiritual fulfillment.
Marion Woodman (August 15, 1928–July 9, 2018) was a Canadian author, poet, analytical psychologist, and women's movement figure. She wrote and spoke about the dream theories of Carl Gustav Jung. This talk is from 1997.
The absence of spirit often generates a longing to reconnect with spirit, but this longing can be interrupted by our ego if it has become defensive, hardened or rational in its orientation. An overly intellectual attitude, and a demand for proof or reason, can kill off the life of the spirit and prevent us from experiencing its healing field. In our highly intellectualised world this is a persistent danger. Jung is uncompromising in his view that Western intellectualism is hugely responsible for the proliferation of neuroses: Anyone who cherishes a rationalistic opinion … has isolated himself psychologically and stands opposed to his own basic human nature. This contains a fundamental truth about all neuroses, for nervous disorders consist primarily in an alienation from one's instincts, a splitting off of consciousness from certain basic facts of the psyche. Hence rationalistic opinions come unexpectedly close to neurotic symptoms. Like these, they consist in distorted thinking, which takes the place of psychologically correct thinking. The latter kind of thinking always retains its connection with the heart, with the depths of the psyche, the tap-root.

an excerpt from David Tacey's "Gods and Diseases: Making Sense of Our Physical and Mental Wellbeing"
Dr. Jordan B. Peterson
A conversation with Dr. Jordan B. Peterson and Dr. Stephen Blackwood about Solzhenitsyn, our cultural inflection point, higher education, and the hunger of the young for meaning.

Dr. Peterson wrote the bestselling book 12 Rules for Life: An Antidote to Chaos.
Dr. Peterson is a Canadian clinical psychologist, cultural critic, and professor of psychology at the University of Toronto. His main areas of study are the psychology of religious and ideological belief, and the assessment and improvement of personality and performance.

Dr Stephen Blackwood is the president of Ralston College, a new university being founded in Savannah, Georgia.
C.G. Jung answers the question:
“Can we assume that individual consciousness continues after death?”
You realize that this is very difficult to answer. To put it briefly, it's a question of conscious immortality. This is a question our Lord Buddha was asked twice. Read more
No one’s business but mine
This dance
Is like a weapon
Of self-defence,
Against the present
The present tense
No, I won't get heavy, don't get heavy
Keep it light and keep it moving
I am doing no harm
As my world comes crashing down I'll be dancing, freaking out
Deaf, dumb, and blind

In you, I'm lost

I won't turn around or the penny drops
Won't stop now, won't slack off
Or all this love will be in vain
To stop from falling down a mine
It's no one's business but mine
Where all this love has been in vain

In you, I'm lost
More insights are coming soon!
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Solomon Asch was a Polish-American gestalt psychologist and pioneer in social psychology. He studied how individuals yielded to or defied a majority group and the effect of group influence on beliefs and opinions.

We are still as possessed by our autonomous psychic contents as if they were gods. Today they are called phobias, compulsions, and so forth, or in a word, neurotic symptoms. The gods have become diseases; Zeus no longer rules Olympus but the solar plexus, and creates specimens for the physician's consulting room, or disturbs the brains of the politicians and journalists who then unwittingly unleash mental epidemics.

The Milgram experiment on obedience to authority figures was a series of social psychology experiments conducted in 1965 by Stanley Milgram. They measured the willingness of study participants, men from a diverse range of occupations with varying levels of education, to obey an authority figure who instructed them to perform acts conflicting with their personal conscience. Participants were led to believe that they were assisting an unrelated experiment, in which they had to administer electric shocks to a "learner." These fake electric shocks gradually increased to levels that would have been fatal had they been real.

As you are narrowing the field of your attention to any specific part of the body, you free yourself from your addiction to emotional tensions. You will also feel a great improvement in circulation, which then takes your emotional comfort further.


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